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Ozarkberries

persimmon.JPG

Okay, so there’s no such thing as Ozarkberries. (I have seen a combination of common berries baked in a pie referred to as Ozark Berry Pie though.)

What you see here is, of course, a green persimmon. I was a bit surprised to find these given the continuing drought in my part of Missouri. This one is about half the size of what I’ve commonly seen. Also, now that I know better how to identify these trees, I am seeing persimmons more frequently at Roundrock. (Did I mention I’d found yet another mature walnut in my woods?)

Anyway, I’ve tasted some of the ripe persimmons at Roundrock, and even those are much too astringent for my mouth to handle. I gave an account of one such experience here.

This tree will probably come down some day as I begin the work of clearing out the northern fence line in anticipation of bringing in power lines. That could be another five years away (anyone figured out yet how to become independently wealthy without much trouble?), but if I clear a tree or two at a time, I may be finished by then. Perhaps I’ll leave the persimmon for last so the raccoons will still like me.

Missouri calendar:

  • Thirteen-lined ground squirrels begin to gorge.

8 Responses to “Ozarkberries”

  1. karl Says:

    i just found our first ripe persimmon the other day. tabitha loves them. that size you are exhibiting is standard for around here. i’ve never seen much larger local wild persimmon even when we visited the sparta, missouri persimmon-days-festival. tabitha has a gift for harvesting them and makes the most wonderful persimmon jam. a persimmon that is not completely ripe is awful and another few hours on the tree, especially after a frost, makes for a wonderful treat. the trick is, lay down a tarp and shake the tree. any that fall are ripe and tasty if you have to pluck them from the branches they are not finished yet.
    regarding the drought we have gotten a considerable amount of rain this season. especially compared to last year, where-as, when we did get a few rain drops they’d make mini dust clouds in their wake in mikes garden.

  2. Ed Abbey Says:

    The only grove up persimmon trees in Iowa existed on a fence row of a neighbors field about two miles up the road. Unfortunately, he bulldozed them out to build a new fence for cows. They were very tasty and I miss them.

    I saw your calendar note. What the heck is a thirteen-lined ground squirrel?

  3. Chery Says:

    We love wild persimmon and go hunting for them all the time. When we find a stand of trees, we watch until they ripen. Try adding 1 cup of pulp when you make home made ice cream. Wonderful.

    Some Ozark carvers use persimmon wood to make wooden spoons. The color of the wood is very pretty.

    My advice is to save the persimmon tree if at all possible.

  4. FloridaCracker Says:

    Mine almost never make fruit.

  5. Genevieve Says:

    Here in southern Kentucky, persimmon trees are called “Possum Trees”. We don’t have one on our little acreage, but I know of one about a mile from here that produces an unusually sweet fruit. I guess I should get some seeds from it and start a tree.

  6. Rurality Says:

    Really, really late coming in here, but… if it’s astringent, it’s not ripe. It may look ripe, but it’s not.

  7. Mary Says:

    My mom was recently in California and had persimmon bread every day. She wants to make some and I’m wondering where I can get persimmons in the St. Louis area without paying $1-1.50 apiece. That’s the price in the local groceries.

    Mary

  8. Deirdre Says:

    I just found a wild persimmon tree in our cul-de-sac here in Bella Vista, Arkansas. The fruit is small, but very good. We wait until it falls from the tree, then pick it up and eat it. We’ve harvested quite a lot, and I am wondering if anyone has a good recipe for persimmon jam or preserve? I agree with Rurality…if the fruit is still on the tree, generally it’s not ripe yet. Give it a chance!

    Dee

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