Ring Neck

ring neck.JPG

This little beauty is a Prairie Ring-Necked Snake. I’ve stated here a number of times that we rarely see snakes when we visit Roundrock, but now this makes us two for two in recent visits.

We came upon this snake shortly after we had arrived that morning, and the fact that it stuck around long enuf for me to snap a few pictures of it had me worried at first. The rocks you see in the ground around it are the large chunks of gravel that comprise our road into our woods. I feared that we had just driven over the snake. After examining it a bit more closely, however, we realized it was still alive. I suppose it was sluggish because the morning was still cool. In any case, it soon slithered into the tall weeds beside the road, probably in search of some crickets or earthworms for breakfast.

Missouri calendar:

  • Coyote pups begin emerging from dens.

20 Responses to “Ring Neck”

  1. Ontario Wanderer Says:

    Neat snake. I found a snake about this size under my tent one morning in Kenya. I was poking it to wake it up and get it moving when one of the guides informed me it was a young Cobra. Guess it was good I didn’t get it moving too much. I was more used to Ring-necked Snakes.

  2. Floridacracker Says:

    Dainty. Ain’t he?

  3. Wayne Says:

    AHHH – ringneck snakes. They’re the most often found and most-appreciated of the snakes that turn up here. I love finding them – sometimes as tiny babies and sometimes as perky adults – they’re alway docile and tolerant and it’s a pleasure to fondle them and then let them go in a safe place. Glad you found one!

  4. Happy and Blue 2 Says:

    Does it have a ring around it’s neck so it knows where its head is..

  5. doubleknot Says:

    Such a nice looking snake.
    How in the world do you get so much spam? I hardly get any but my server filters my emails pretty close. I don’t even recieve those, um – dirty sort of emails that other people say they get all the time.

  6. Kerrdelune Says:

    I have always wanted to see one of these snakes, but (alas) they do not hang out this far north – the photo is a beauty though and almost as good as seeing one in the flesh.

  7. endment Says:

    wonderful photo… We have been seeing quite a number of snakes but I have yet to meet a ring-necked snake.

  8. Duane Keys Says:

    Neat snake, I decded to post a snake themed post today as well (well, sort of starts that way).

    You might try installing some captcha software to head of some of the spammers, much like blogger has done. It does a good job.

  9. Wayne Says:

    I concur with Duane – if you are getting that much spam appearing in comments (and you do a great job, Pablo, if you’re managing to delete it without my seeing it!) then you need to investigate using captchas. Surely wordpress has that facility.

    (On the other hand, if you’re just saying that you can look at your log and see attempts at spam, well, I can look at my log and 95% of it is that. None of it gets through, is all.)

    Just to go a little further – the Seed Science blogs have also been having a lot of trouble, and for whatever reason prefer to require registration for commenters than captchas. Sorry – I’m very resistant toward registering on any blog for commenting, but have no disinclination to type in a few letters that I see in a captcha.

  10. Pablo Says:

    Wayne – I’ve stopped commenting on the ScienceBlogs because of that. I suppose I could register, but I don’t really think I have much of worth to say, and I’m leery of giving out info since I’m already such a big spam target. My clever son-in-law does all of my coding work for me. He knows the “troubles” I am facing, so I rely on him to come up with the best solutions. Walter at Sugar Mountain Farm passed along a code change for dealing with spam. I don’t understand how it works, but I passed it along to SIL.

  11. Wayne Says:

    Pablo – same here. IIRC, wordpress is an evolved b2, which is what I use. I don’t have captcha, just a half-ass substitute script that works ok, but I’m sure wordpress at least has that as an option, if not captcha. Your SIL will know exactly what to do, and then you can bask in the satisfaction that all those slimy spammers are being kept out.

  12. oldwhitelady Says:

    Now, that’s a nice looking snake.

  13. Leslie Says:

    We had a ring necked snake that hung out around our house in Georgia for a while. We called him Bob, which was short for “Ring-a-ma-Bob”.

  14. Lee Says:

    I caught a baby (8″ long-1/4″diameter) ring-neck snake [it almost looks like the one posted above(orange ring)] at a local park and put in an aquarium with aquarium rocks and water covering bottom of tank and in-between the bottom layer of rocks, morning glory vines, sticks, and a normal rock. It also has a double bulbed heat lamp, but it seems a bit warm in the aquarium. Also, I went out at night and caught some earthworms, nightcrawlers, rollie-pollie’s, beetles, etc…, but I’m not too sure it’s eating any of them…I saw the beetle still in there so…If you have any suggestions on what to feed it and/or what artificial environment would be best for it I would sure apprecieate it.

    I talked to some of the biology/science teachers at our high school and they suggested meal-worms, crickets; heat rock or remove one bulb from the heat lamp.

    Lee

  15. pablo Says:

    Lee – Sorry, but I don’t know what they need.

  16. tori Says:

    I need to know the tempurature and where it gets water ughhhhh

  17. Michael Says:

    Ring-necked snakes are notoriously difficult to keep in captivity, and usually won’t eat. They’re lovely little snakes, but it’s probably best not to try to make them into pets.

    Cheers,

    Michael

  18. Jillybean Says:

    I am sooo sad, while moving my bird of paradise plant I hurt the baby ring neck snake that was hiding underneath!! It was barely 6 inches long. It was all black except for the beautiful orange ring. I was looking to see what kind of snake it was, since buying this house I have seen some very unusual critters!! I hope it makes it, I hate hurting things like that!! 🙁

  19. Jan Says:

    Hi we live in UK in Dorset. We have been house sitting in the country. Nr Wareham. Yesterday we found a little blacksnake about the size of a slow worm. It had a white neck with two black triangles on its back next and down its sides had little charcoal triangles down each side, it was more of a dark grey. My husband not fond of snakes got it onto his sandal, put it outside, it seemed shy and went into the shade of his sandal/mules. Which was in his hand I might add. Has. It found an opening to go into in between the wooden decking/walkway. I was not quick enough to photo it. But drew it. Bit scary in case it had a mommy some place eeeek.
    We are curious. I looked it up on my tablet. Many of the pictures were similar except for the markings. Tho babies can look different once older I guess.
    Bfn Jan an Del ?

  20. Jan Says:

    Hi we live in UK in Dorset. We have been house sitting in the country. Nr Wareham. Yesterday we found a little blacksnake about the size of a slow worm. It had a white neck with two black triangles on its back next and down its sides had little charcoal triangles down each side, it was more of a dark grey. My husband not fond of snakes got it onto his sandal, put it outside, it seemed shy and went into the shade of his sandal/mules. Which was in his hand I might add. Has. It found an opening to go into in between the wooden decking/walkway. I was not quick enough to photo it. But drew it. Bit scary in case it had a mommy some place eeeek.
    We are curious. I looked it up on my tablet. Many of the pictures were similar except for the markings. Tho babies can look different once older I guess.
    Bfn Jan an Del ?

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